External news

This page contains links to health related news stories from other organisations.

Oxleas NHS Foundation Trust is not responsible for the content of these stories and they do not reflect the views of the trust.

Why insurers should fund medical research

14th April 2014

BBC News - Health

With research funding low - but insurance payouts soaring - leading lung experts are suggesting a novel solution.

Ofsted inspections and targets harming teachers' mental health, finds survey

14th April 2014

Society: Mental health | guardian.co.uk

More than half of teachers surveyed by ATL union say work pressures having detrimental effect on their mental wellbeingA relentless inspection regime and culture of target-setting is damaging teachers' mental health, with many reporting stress and exhaustion, a survey by a teaching union has found.More than half (55%) of those questioned by the Association of Teachers and Lecturers (ATL) say work pressures are having a detrimental effect on their mental wellbeing, while almost four in 10 have noticed a rise in mental health problems among colleagues over the past two years. Continue reading...

Are we using antidepressants to paper over the cracks of a fractured society?

13th April 2014

Society: Mental health | guardian.co.uk

Use of antidepressant drugs has become more common than ever before. Perhaps it's time that we looked at the wider causes of this trendThe chances are that you know someone who takes antidepressants. Or maybe you take them yourself. If so, you are in good company. More than 50m prescriptions for antidepressants are written in the UK every year and, although the not all of the pills will be swallowed taking into account repeat prescriptions and failure to collect from pharmacies the figure is still staggeringly high.There's a positive side to the 50m statistic, though. It suggests that as the stigma ...

Goggles help surgeons ‘see’ tumours

13th April 2014

BBC News - Health

The glasses that help surgeons find cancer

Hepatitis C trial a 'turning point'

12th April 2014

BBC News - Health

A new treatment for hepatitis C cured 90% of patients with the infection in 12 weeks, say scientists after studies in Europe and the US.

Art therapies have become a mainstream partner to medicalised healing | Ruth Wishart

11th April 2014

Society: Mental health | guardian.co.uk

Murals in hospitals, personalised musical memories for dementia sufferers, a Hillsborough memorial symphony all give respite to troubled soulsThere is a fire extinguisher featured in Bridget Riley's latest artwork, unveiled earlier this week. Several in fact, given they are an obligatory part of the furniture in hospital corridors. And the 56 metres of this arresting mural, with characteristic horizontal lines in bold colours, adorn the 10th floor of St Mary's Hospital in London.The charity that commissioned it, Imperial College Healthcare, reasons that the impact is therapeutic on staff as well as the more transient audience of patients. It says high-quality ...

How often is prostate cancer misdiagnosed?

11th April 2014

BBC News - Health

The headline is worrying: "half of prostate cancer misdiagnosed".

AUDIO: Man held for giving wife pain patch

11th April 2014

BBC News - Health

An elderly man was locked up for seven hours after giving his wife a painkiller patch at her care home.

My father's death has left my confidence in tatters especially when it comes to relationships

11th April 2014

Society: Mental health | guardian.co.uk

My dad's death and a long period of unemployment have left me feeling incredibly anxious particularly when it comes to dating. What should I do?Since my father killed himself, I've lost all self-confidence, amplified by a long period of unemployment. After my doctor prescribed antidepressants, I managed to get my head together and have been employed full-time for the past 20 months, and am now off the medication (as agreed with my doctor). The quality of my life has improved, but despite this, my self-confidence has been shot down. I'm in my late 20s but I feel like an anxious ...

No way to reliably identify low-risk prostate cancer

11th April 2014

NHS Choices: Behind the headlines

“Men with prostate cancer being given 'false hope',” The Daily Telegraph reports. UK researchers have examined the accuracy of different methods that have sometimes been used (mostly outside the UK) to identify “clinically insignificant” prostate cancers – those that would not be expected to affect a man during his lifetime (meaning he is likely to die of something else). There has been considerable debate about overtreatment of such slower growing, low grade prostate cancers – not least because complications of treatment, such as erectile dysfunction can be life-changing. Monitoring a man (known as “active surveillance”) can often be the preferred ...